• Posted on

    Change font size in screenshots created with Frameit

    Frameit is a very nice utility to create nice looking App Store screenshots. It will take your images, add a device frame around them and optionaly a title of your choosing in multiple language. In short, it’s a godsend.

    But unfortunatly, as any tool, it has a few shortcomings. One of them (for my use case at least) is that there’s no way to choose the size of the font you’re using for your titles.

    For example, look at this screenshot for my app Librairie - Ebook Cloud Reader:

    Bad screenshot

    It’s not bad per se but it could be much better with a bigger font to add some punch. The corresponding json is:

            {
                "filter": "collection",
                "title": {
                    "color": "#bc1626"
                    ,"text": "Automatically sync and read all your ebooks stored in the cloud"
                }
            }
    

    The trick is to make Frameit think that the text will take more space and as a consequence use bigger font to fill that space. For this, you can use a new line character in your description. The Framefile.json becomes:

            {
                "filter": "collection",
                "title": {
                    "color": "#bc1626"
                    ,"text": "Automatically sync and read all\nyour ebooks stored in the cloud"
                }
            }
    

    And the rendered screenshot:

    Good screenshot

    Et voilà !

  • Posted on

    Amazon introduces Lex

    Yesterday, Amazon introduced a new service in beta called Lex:


    Amazon Lex is a service for building conversational interfaces into any application using voice and text. Lex provides the advanced deep learning functionalities of automatic speech recognition (ASR) for converting speech to text, and natural language understanding (NLU) to recognize the intent of the text, to enable you to build applications with highly engaging user experiences and lifelike conversational interactions. With Amazon Lex, the same deep learning technologies that power Amazon Alexa are now available to any developer, enabling you to quickly and easily build sophisticated, natural language, conversational bots (“chatbots”).

    In a nutshell, this is a Siri competitor available for all developpers. And instead of being limited to the handfull of intents that Apple provides (and won’t extend until at least next year iOS major version) you can use it for whatever use case you want. You can even use text to talk to this “assistant” an often asked feature for Siri.

    Obviously the drawback is that you won’t be able to invoke it from outside your app. Still that seems massively interesting.

  • Posted on

    Paris' Passerelle Simone de Beauvoir

    For those who have liked the Lucky Knot Bridge posted by Kotke this morning I humbly present la passerelle Simone de Beauvoir.

    Passerelle Simone de Beauvoir

    This bridge is located in Paris and links the 13th district (on the left bank of the Seine river) with the 12th district (on the right bank). It was opened in 2006.

    Paris is a beautifull city, more modern than what one might imagine.

  • Posted on

    Hit where it hurts

    Speaking of which, HP is trying to capitalize on the current backlash against Apple among its pro users:


    HP Store

    The screen capture is in french, for some reason I couldn’t get the english version. It says that “Pros are moving from the Mac to HP”. And they’re giving a few testimonials of video peoples.

  • Posted on

    Anti-halo effect

    Brent Simmons about Apple leaving more and more markets:


    I can’t help but think that it’s a kind of an anti-halo effect. I can’t help but think that once we start looking elsewhere, we’ll look elsewhere more and more. We’ll get used to it. We’ll find out that other companies make things that work and are, in some cases, delightful.

    I think it’s a very smart analysis. Especially when you remember how Apple climbed out of its grave with the iPod that brought a lot of people to the Mac and the iPhone. Their saving grace (for the moment) is that there’s no single other company that may attract their customers with a large range of excellent products.

    But one thing that Apple should keep in mind: each time they narrow their product line they increase the impact of releasing a potential turd. What if the new MacBook Pros are a failure (I’m not saying they are) ? What if the next iPhone explodes like a Galaxy Note ?



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